Posts Tagged ‘sugar modelling’

Ruffles, Baby Elephant, and Thomas!

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Don’t worry, all the things in the title were not all on the same cake :).

Last week was literally my busiest week of cake making to date. I had five orders that had to go out the door and most of them were anything but simple! It was a gruelling week, every night I’d crawl into bed around 1:30am exhausted and aching, then I’d be back at it again early the next morning. Two orders were picked up on Friday, one was delivered on Saturday, and the remaining two went out on Sunday. On Sunday night I collapsed in bed at 8pm and slept for 13 hours!

But as tiring and hard as the week was, it was also very satisfying. I never thought I’d ever be this busy! And I was very happy with all the end products. Two of the orders were picked up before they could be photographed (a 3D car and a grey ombre cake with fondant bow tie on top) but here are the other three cakes I made this past week.

First up is a pink ombre ruffle cake. I’m getting a lot of enquiries for ombre cakes this year. This particular cake ended up taking a lot more time than I had anticipated. This was a double barrel cake so was 6 inches tall rather than the usual 4, therefore the ruffles took ages. It took around 4 hours to make the ruffles and apply them to the cake. The bunting I made from cardboard, paper straws and baby pink ribbons. Pretty and pink!

Pink ombre ruffle cake

Pink ombre ruffle cake

The cake itself was a sponge cake that consisted of 4 different coloured layers to mimic the ombre effect of the ruffles on the exterior of the cake. It’s always time consuming having to mix up several different colours of batter, especially when you only have 2 cake tins of the correct size so you can only make up 2 layers at a time. And sponge cake is tricky as you can easily overmix when adding in food colouring.

The inside of the cake was coloured to match the outside.

The inside of the cake was coloured to match the outside. Photo supplied by client.

Next is this cute baby shower cake, which I was very fond of as I designed it myself. I love the colour combination of chocolate brown with blue and I think it is a beautiful choice for a boy baby shower cake. I was given free reign on the design of this one which I love being able to do! I opted for chocolate brown and pale blue fondant buttons, fondant ribbon and bow, bunting made from butcher’s twine with fondant flags on wooden skewers, and a super cute hand crafted gumpaste baby elephant with pale blue accents.

Button and elephant pale blue and chocolate brown baby shower cake

Button and elephant pale blue and chocolate brown baby shower cake

 

The elephant was based on a tutorial I saw on http://www.galletilandia.com – it’s not in English but the pictures are easy to follow.

The gumpaste elephant I made for the baby shower cake

The sweet gumpaste elephant I made for the baby shower cake

The last cake I want to share with you is one I’ve been wanting to make for the past 3 years – a 3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake! I was so pleased to finally get my chance. I tried using a book by Debbie Brown to make this one but I had trouble understanding her instructions so I ended up just doing my own thing. Carving it was surprisingly easy and ganaching it was surprisingly hard!

3D Thomas the Tank Engine carved out of cake ready for ganaching.

3D Thomas the Tank Engine being carved out of cake

There were a lot of details which were time consuming, but overall it’s easier than you might think (although maybe I just think that now that I’ve gotten a few carved vehicle cakes under my belt) and it was quite enjoyable to do. It was the last cake I finished of the five I had to make so I was pretty happy with how it turned out, especially considering how exhausted I was by then.

3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake

3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake

And in case you were wondering what the 3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake looks like when it’s cut up, here you go!

3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake cut up

3D Thomas the Tank Engine cake cut up

May 2011 – What a Great Month!

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

For some reason May usually seems to be a really good month for Delicious Cake Design. May 2011 was no exception – I was absolutely thrilled and honoured for my Muppets Toy Box cake to be included in the Cake Wrecks Sunday Sweets Jim Henson Tribute. Cake Wrecks is a very famous American blog which normally posts pictures of hilariously awful cakes, but on Sundays they turn “sweet” and post pictures of amazing cakes. And my cake was one of them! Check it out here, it’s the Muppets in a toy chest cake which is about the 6th picture down the page:
http://cakewrecks.blogspot.com/2011/05/sunday-sweets-jim-henson-tribute.html

Apart from that great honour, in May I had a lot of fun making some interesting cakes and here are my favourites.

Garfield birthday cake

Garfield birthday cake

I’m a Garfield fan from way back and have been dying for an excuse to make a Garfield cake for ages. I was so pleased to finally get the opportunity! The head and body are made of cake. The paws, tail, ears, blanket, and facial features are all hand modelled from fondant. The black stripes on his head, in his ears, and on his tail were hand painted. I’ve been doodling pictures of Garfield since I was about 10 years old, so I knew exactly how I wanted to paint on the stripes. The box is also made of fondant and hand painted for a streaky, wood grain effect.

 

Manolo Blahnik shoebox and high heel cake

Manolo Blahnik shoebox and high heel cake

The shoebox cake with fondant/gumpaste high heel shoe is a very popular design, but this is the first time I’ve actually made it! The shoebox is made of cake and the high heel shoe is made from modelling fondant/gumpaste. Once again the edible printer proved itself useful to make the Manolo Blahnik labels. Here is a close up of the shoe:

Fondant gumpaste Manolo Blahnik high heel shoe

Fondant gumpaste Manolo Blahnik high heel shoe

I modelled the shoe on a real Manolo design and it is entirely edible apart from the diamante brooch. It was my first time to make a shoe and I was really pleased with how it turned out.

 

White peony and white lace Mother's Day cake

White peony and white lace Mother's Day cake

I made this one for my mother for Mother’s Day. I wanted to try lace stencilling with royal icing, it’s actually pretty hard to do on a round cake! In hindsight, I wish I’d attempted it on a square cake first. I was still pleased with how it turned out though. Mum loves peonies so I hand crafted a white peony from fondant/gumpaste. She saved it and keeps it in a vase in her living room. I was so pleased with how much she loved the cake!

Hand crafted white peony made from fondant gumpaste

Hand crafted white peony made from fondant gumpaste

How to Make a Sugar Gonzo

Friday, October 15th, 2010

As promised, here is a post on making my Muppet & Sesame Street Toy Box Cake characters! For this cake I created 7 Muppet and Sesame Street characters from modelling paste by hand and made a chocolate cake toy box covered with fondant. I studied lots of photos on the internet of each Muppet and made them based on these so I don’t have any explicit written instructions. I will try to explain here how to make Gonzo.

My Muppet & Sesame Street toy box cake

My Muppet & Sesame Street toy box cake

There is no need to do the full bodies of the characters, you only need to make the heads, upper torsos and upper arms as these are the only parts visibly sticking out of the toy box. Below is a picture of the characters before they were put in the box so you can see what I mean.

My hand made sugar modelled Muppet & Sesame Street characters

My hand made sugar modelled Muppet & Sesame Street characters

To make the Muppet and Sesame Street characters, I used home made modelling sugar paste (aka gum paste). To do this is very easy, you will need fondant (aka sugarpaste) then just knead in some gum powder to add strength and cause the fondant to dry harder faster. The most commonly used gum powders are gum tragacanth and CMC tylose powder, I used Wilton Gum Tex powder for my characters. These are all readily available from specialty cake decorating supply shops. For coloured modelling paste, you can either buy coloured fondant or use edible paste colours such as AmeriColor or Sugar Flair to colour it with.

If you can get your hands on Squires Kitchen Sugar Dough, I highly recommend it. The consistency, large variety of colours, and ease of use are superb. Even if you just get white, you can colour it. I haven’t found anywhere to buy it cheaply here in Oz so I am making my own modelling paste.

Regardless of what modelling paste you use, make sure to keep it wrapped securely in a plastic bag at all times when it is not being used to stop it from drying out. Just take a small bit that you need to model with and leave the rest wrapped in the bag.

To create Gonzo’s head, colour some modelling paste a mid-blue for his head and body and a little bit of paste a paler more purpley blue for his nose. Roll an oval shape from the mid-blue and rough it up a bit for a fur texture using a small scalpel. Roll the paler paste into a fat sausage, flatten one end to make his mouth area and curve the other to make his nose. Use some sugar glue to stick this part to the bottom of the front of his head. Take a small scalpel and cut in a curved mouth on the flattened area. Below you can see the start of Gonzo’s head plus the finished Kermit and Rolf.

Finished Kermit and Rolf and the start of Gonzo's head

Finished Kermit and Rolf and the start of Gonzo's head

Roll some white modelling paste into 2 balls to make the eyes. Glue them on top of Gonzo’s nose. Roll some black modelling paste out very thinly and cut out 2 really small circles and carefully glue them onto the centre of the eyeballs. Gonzo’s eyelids consist of a blue lid on the bottom and a yellow lid on the top. Roll out some mid-blue paste and cut 2 thin strips. Glue them onto the top of his eyeballs, following the curve of the ball. Repeat with some yellow paste, sticking it on top of the mid-blue eyelid.

Adding Gonzo's eyelids

Adding Gonzo's eyelids

To create Gonzo’s body, take some mid-blue paste and roll it into a long sausage, then flatten the ends to create the torso. Give it some texture as you did for the head to create a fur effect. Cut through the sides to create arms. Roll out some yellow paste into a strip and use a circle cutter to cut a circle from the middle, then glue it onto the body with the circle on the top to make room for the head. This allows a bit of the blue fur of the torso to show above the top of the neckline of his shirt.

Gonzo's body

Gonzo's body

Apply some sugar glue to the top of the torso and stick Gonzo’s head on. If he isn’t staying put, you can take a short length of dry spaghetti and use it to secure the torso and head together by inserting it into the top of the torso with a bit sticking out the top, then sticking the head onto the torso with the top of the spaghetti passing through the bottom of the head. I found I didn’t need to use any spaghetti as the heads stuck on well on their own. Here is the finished Gonzo.

My finished Gonzo sugar model

My finished Gonzo sugar model

Here is a picture to help you get started on making Fozzie. You can see his torso in the background before it’s been roughed up to look furry. His hat is sitting on the board, as are his eyes and nose. His head is sitting in the foam flower former.

Creating Fozzie

Creating a sugar model of Fozzie

Squires Kitchen 5 Day School – Day 4: Modelling

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

Today was the day of the Squires Kitchen 5 Day School that I was most looking forward to – Character Modelling with Jan Clement-May. I love character modelling and I was eager to learn some tricks of the trade from someone as experienced as Jan. She has written several cake decorating books and is a regular contributor to Cakes & Sugarcraft magazine.

When I saw the project we would be making, I was quite daunted. There were a LOT of elements to it! It was a scene set in a flower filled grass field of a mother, her little boy, her baby girl, and the family dog having a picnic complete with picnic rug, picnic basket, plates of sausages, sandwiches, fruit, a cake, a thermos, and a baby bottle, plus a family of ducks. All to be completed in one day! For someone like Jan, that would take her only 3 hours. We had just under 6 hours to learn how to do it and complete it. I had my doubts as to whether or not we would be able to finish the whole lot in that amount of time.

We started off by covering a 10 inch square board with green sugar dough. Then we mixed some dark blue sugar dough with white and created pale blue picnic blankets with hand drawn lines in a checkered pattern. We rolled out some white sugar paste and cut out tiny blossoms to be glued on later. So far so good. Next Jan showed us how to create legs out of a sausage shape. We created legs for the mother and the son and glued them to the board. Next were shoes – shoes are made by creating a pear shape and indenting them where it becomes thinner to create a heel. We glued the shoes to the legs on the board, and it was starting to kind of look like something (sort of):

Legs, shoes, and a picnic blanket

Legs, shoes, and a picnic blanket

It was time to create the bodies. Bodies were made from a cone shape which we smoothed down over a thumb to create a rounded and less flat look. To create a bust for the mother, we indented with our fingers at about the waist and smoothed down. The torsos were placed on top of the legs and wooden skewers gently rotated through the middle to secure them. A little bit was left sticking out the top to secure the head and neck later on. A small piece of flesh coloured sugar dough was placed on top of the torso to create a neck. My mother started off reasonably slim, as you will see in later photos, she somehow seemed to gain weight!

Mother's slimmer torso fitted

Making sure Mother's slimmer torso fits before skewering it

We created arms out of sausage shaped strips of flesh coloured sugar dough. To create hands, we slightly flattened the ends of the arms and cut a slit on one side and separated out the “thumb”.  We also created sleeves out of triangular pieces of sugar dough for the shoulders. The arms were attached to the torsos with sugar glue followed by the sleeves.

Next we created the baby. We mixed red and white sugar dough, rolled a bit into a ball, then smoothed down over a thumb again to create the nappy. A ball of flesh coloured dough was placed on top of the nappy with an indent for a belly button. Legs, arms and booties were created and attached, then the head and a little golden curl. Here is the baby I created:

The baby girl is added to the picnic

The baby girl is added to the picnic

We then made the plates, sandwiches and sausages for the picnic. Plates were round circles indented with the end of small rolling pins. Sandwiches were white triangles and we used red edible ink pens to colour in lines of “jam” around them. Sausages were made by rolling out brown sugar dough into a long thin sausage and cutting it into sections then rounding the ends gently with a finger. Then it was time for lunch.

After lunch, we created the heads for the mother and son. We were instructed to give them a more oval shape. These were attached to the torsos through the wooden skewers. Then we made the ducks by rolling balls of yellow sugar dough then pinching the ends up and outward. Little beaks were attached with sugar dough and eyes dotted on with black edible ink pens. Here are my little duckies:

My little sugar ducks

My little sugar ducks

We next made some fruit for the picnic. Round balls of sugar dough for apples and oranges and sausage shapes curved to form bananas. A little cake was made out of round circles of brown sugar dough with a red circle that had been frilled slightly in between to make jam, and a white circle on the top that was also frilled downwards for cream with some little red balls of fruit. Here is all the food I made:

Food for the picnic made from sugar dough

Food for the picnic made from sugar dough

We also made a dog out of sugar dough by rolling out cone shaped pieces for the legs and a big fatter cone for the body. We cut lines in the paws for “toes” then glued the torso onto the legs. The head was made from a pear shaped piece of dough with the small end flattened. Ears were cone shaped pieces flattened and the tail was a small sausage curled up. Dark brown spots were added to the torso.

Next up was a picnic basket made of dark brown sugar dough rolled into a ball then the end of a small rolling pin was pushed into it to create the basket cavity. We cut out a thin-ish piece of pink dough to make a blanket which we put inside, then a thick sausage shape of the dark brown dough was curved and attached to the basket as a handle.

We then glued the food onto the plates and glued the plates onto the picnic rug and around the scene. Some fruit and a plate was also added to the picnic basket. The ducks were glued into place and the blossoms as well. We were fast running out of time, so instead of creating the bottle and thermos, we asked if we could create the hair next for mother and son as they were still completely bald at this stage.

Jan showed us how to use a sugar gun for this. We were also instructed to add quite a bit of vegetable fat to the sugar dough to make it the consistency of chewing gum as this would be easier to push through the sugar gun. We created hair using the sugar gun and glued them to our models.

At this point it was the end of the day and we had to finish up. We didn’t have time to make the thermos and baby bottle. All in all it wasn’t a bad looking bit of sugar modelling though, but as you can see in the below pic, my mother seems to have gained some weight around the middle! Not sure what happened there, too much cake and sausage perhaps?

The finished product

The finished product

While I enjoyed the sugar modelling, I didn’t enjoy the break neck speed at which we were expected to complete everything. I felt under a lot of pressure and if you fell slightly behind it was incredibly hard to catch up.

Part of the problem was that we had so much to do that Jan kept moving us along too fast. Instead of going at the speed of the average person in the class, she was going at the speed of the fastest. Which meant the majority of us would still be in the middle of doing a step and she would show us how to do the next one. We either had to stop what we were doing, watch her instructions, then go back to what we were doing, finish it and try to remember what she said to do for the next step, or else we continued what we were doing while she was giving instructions in an attempt not to get left behind any further and completely miss quite a lot of the detail of what we were supposed to do next.

It would have been preferable to create half as many models and learn to do them properly rather than create a greater range of things where we missed so much of the instructions that we had to muddle through as best we could. It seemed like we were given the bare minimum on how to create each piece, which we could have gotten from a book. The point of going to the class is to get more than you would from a book, all the little tips and tricks, but we didn’t get any of that. Jan didn’t go into any detail about how to get a smooth finish for example. I was lucky as I have done some sugar modelling before, but for many people it was their first time and they had no idea how to achieve this so there were some lumpy models.

So while I liked the finished product I ended up with, I still would have preferred to have a less hectic and more information filled experience.

Making a 3D Snoopy Kennel Cake

Monday, July 5th, 2010

Last week I made a 3D cake of Snoopy lying on top of his kennel and it is possibly my new favourite cake. It consisted of a kennel made entirely of cake, with a sugar modelled Snoopy a lying on top of the roof with a little sugar modelled Woodstock perched on his tummy.  I had a very similar Snoopy money box as a child which I loved, so I jumped at the chance to re-create it in cake. It was a fair bit of work, but I loved the end result and it was a big hit!

To make the kennel, I baked a 10 inch square madeira cake. I tried creating the kennel at first with butter cake and it was a disaster, really horrible to carve. It seems madeira is a lot easier to work with if you are going to be carving to make a 3D cake. I halved and buttercreamed the cake, then took a sharp, long bladed knife and cut off bits to make a triangular roof shape. I did this quite precisely, measuring length and angles as I went to ensure a uniform and balanced roof. Here is the roof (you can see some of the bits of cake that were cut off in the background):

The roof of Snoopy's kennel carved out of cake

The roof of Snoopy's kennel carved out of cake

I took the remainder of the cake and did a little bit of measuring and carving to create as perfect a rectangular piece as I could for the kennel base. I spread buttercream over the top of the kennel base and stuck the roof on top of it like so:

The kennel cake assembled and ready to cover

The kennel cake assembled and ready to cover

Then it was just a matter of crumb coating and covering the base with white rolled fondant, colouring some fondant red and covering the roof, and using a knife and a ruler to cut some shallow lines along the fondant of the roof and kennel base. I then left this to dry.

While the kennel was drying, I moved on to creating the sugar models of Snoopy and Woodstock. I did each bit of them in separate parts – the head, nose, ears, torso, arms, legs, etc were all done as individual bits. I included little details such as indentations on Snoopy’s paws to show “toes” and “fingers”, and little feathers on Woodstock’s wings. Woodstock was quite hard to make as he was so small and very fiddly! After they had dried a little I used sugar glue to stick Snoopy together and secure him on top of the roof and did the same with little Woodstock. Here’s a close up of the assembled Snoopy and Woodstock:

Close up of sugar Snoopy and Woodstock

Close up of sugar Snoopy and Woodstock

Next I took a tiny bit of fondant, coloured it black, rolled it out thinly and cut out an arched doorway which I sugar glued on one side of the kennel. I then coloured the remaining white fondant green and covered the cake board. While the fondant on the board was still wet, I took an icing tip to it to create grass texture.

And voila! Here is the finished product, a cake of Snoopy and Woodstock on top of Snoopy’s kennel:

Sugar Snoopy and Woodstock on top of a kennel made of cake

Sugar Snoopy and Woodstock on top of a kennel made of cake